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Review of New Zealand’s intellectual property system

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Summary of New Zealand intellectual property system review

Auckland UniServices was commissioned by the Ministry of Economic Development to report on the intellectual property (IP) system in New Zealand.  The resulting report was published in April 2010.

The purpose of this research was to:

  • Provide a broad view of the use of, and understanding of, IP rights by New Zealand businesses
  • Examine whether current government IP policies and settings give firms the support they need to increase productivity in the New Zealand economy.

 

Aims of the review into New Zealand’s intellectual property system

Innovation is critical to New Zealand’s long-term prosperity.  The Ministry sought to understand what role New Zealand’s IP system plays in fostering innovative and productive firms, including barriers and opportunities for improvement.

The review examined how New Zealand businesses use intellectual property rights and what factors are considered when deciding how to commercially protect new ideas.  It assessed whether New Zealand businesses are making the best use of intellectual property rights to protect their inventions and innovations.

The review encompassed all forms of intellectual property rights, and other means that firms use to protect their ideas, such as trade secrets.

 

How intellectual property stimulates productivity

The report examined international literature on the role of IP in stimulating innovation and productivity.  It drew upon findings from interviews and surveys conducted with businesses and IP advisors, to find out about their experience with intellectual property rights.  The report sought to examine those businesses or industries where the potential for productivity growth is most promising.

Based on the findings of the research, surveys and interviews, the report provided recommendations for improving New Zealand’s IP system to increase productivity in the New Zealand economy.

 

Intellectual property review does not represent the views of the Ministry of Economic Development

The views in this report do not represent the views of the Ministry of Economic Development.  Should the Ministry decide to act upon any of the recommendations in the report, we will consult with stakeholders.

 

Contact the Intellectual Property Policy Group

If you’re having difficulty accessing this document, or to find out more about intellectual property protection in New Zealand, please contact the Intellectual Property Policy Group.
 

Last updated 25 November 2011